Landscaping Tips

Archive for Landscaping Tips

How often should I Fertilize my lawn?

Ideally, a home lawn only needs to be fertilized when nutrient levels drop below what’s needed to maintain it in a healthy condition.
Fertilizers usually contain the three major nutrients: nitrogen (N) to promote leaf growth and dark green color, phosphorous (P) for root growth, and potassium (K) for stress resistance. Sometimes you will see (S) for sulfur, this will encourage a greener lawn and can help change pH back to acidic conditions if alkalinity is an issue. The three numbers on the bag represent the percentages of each of these elements – always in the order “N-P-K” or “N-P-K-S. Unless the instructions say otherwise, inorganic, commercial fertilizers must always be watered-in after they have been applied. Otherwise, you’ll burn your lawn.

Posted in: Landscaping Tips, Lawn Care

Leave a Comment (0) →

How Often Should I Water My Lawn?

Lawn watering tips

Watering infrequently and deeply will encourage deeper root development. Watering a minimum of 1 inch weekly during the early morning is best to ensure the grass doesn’t stay wet for an extended period of time, this discourages the development of disease. Measure rainfall and sprinkler water with a rain gauge or a coffee can or a tuna can.  High spots and south-facing slopes will need more water than other areas. Apply less water in shady areas that receive less than 4 hours of direct sunlight daily. Grass under large trees will need more water since the tree roots will consume water and the tree canopy may intercept rainfall.  Your lawn may become brown during hot, dry spells. It’s in a dormant state and will green up again when wetter, cooler weather returns. A healthy lawn can survive several weeks in a dormant state.

Posted in: Landscaping Tips, Lawn Care

Leave a Comment (0) →

How to Properly Mow a Lawn

How to Properly Mow a Lawn

So you want to know how to properly mow a lawn? Here it is… mow high, preferably 2.5 to 3 inches. Mowing short weakens the root system and gives weeds a chance to compete with the grass. When the mower is higher the clippings don’t clump. As a general rule experts say to remove only one third of the leaf with each mowing. So if you mow to 3 inches, you can let the grass grow to 4.5 inches. If you mow at 1.5 inches, you’ll need to cut when the grass grows to 2.75 inches.

The shorter you mow, the more frequently you’ll need to mow your lawn to keep to the “one third” rule. The longer between mowing’s, the more likely clippings will have to be picked up.

Mow in different directions and alter the pattern each time if you can. For example, go north-south, east-west, clockwise, counter-clockwise, diagonally, and so forth. This will cut more leaf surface on weeds that may tend to lean in the direction of mowing and may help the grass compete with them. It also reduces soil compaction and turf wear from the wheels.

Sharpen your mower blades at least twice during the growing season. Dull mower blades tear-off rather than cut grass blades. The torn leaves leaves a whitish torn tip and may leave it more susceptible to disease issues.

Posted in: Landscaping Tips, Lawn Care

Leave a Comment (0) →